Funeral Order of Service

FREEPHONE 0800 799 9541

We print onto Premium 350gsm Silk Card & 160gsm Silk for Booklet Inners

Facebook
LinkedIn

Registering A Death In Hospital Guidance

Table of Contents

Losing a loved one can be an overwhelming and emotional experience. When someone dies in a hospital and they were an organ donor, important steps need to be taken within days of the death. From notifying the hospital to understanding the role of the coroner, registering the death and arranging the funeral, it’s essential to handle each aspect with care and attention.

What to do when someone dies in hospital

When a loved one passes away in a hospital, it is important to follow certain procedures. Notifying the hospital about someone who died is the first step. This is usually done by the hospital staff, but if it hasn’t been done, it’s important to ensure that the hospital is informed about the passing.

Obtaining the medical certificate of cause of death is the next crucial step. A necessary document for registering the death is the medical certificate of death, issued by a doctor at the hospital.

Contacting the next of kin, as well as any relevant organisation is a priority when someone dies. Keeping the family and next of kin of the person who has died informed and supported during this difficult time is paramount. They may also need to contact the organ donor organisation if required.

How to register the death

The need to contact the local registrar to register the death is a legal requirement that should be done within five days. The issuance of the medical certificate of death enables the death to be registered. This involves obtaining the medical certificate of cause of death and taking it to the local register office. The registrar will issue a green certificate for burial or cremation, as well as a white certificate which should be filled in and returned to the local council.

Notifying government departments and organizations about someone who died, like the Society of Allied and Independent Funeral Directors, is equally important. After the person has died, responsibilities may include reporting the death to the Department for Work and Pensions and any other relevant organisations, dealing with pensions and taxes, and checking the deceased’s benefits.

It’s crucial to understand the role of the coroner, especially in cases where the post-mortem examination needs to be reported to a coroner. The coroner may ask for a post-mortem examination to determine the cause of death, issue the necessary paperwork, and check the organ donor register if necessary before the death can be registered.

Arranging a funeral after a hospital death

Choosing a funeral director is an important decision, as they will help manage the checklist, including notifying the organisation about the death to be registered, and if required, issuing a medical certificate. A checklist provided by the funeral director can assist in arranging the funeral, handling significant paperwork, including the need to contact various organisations, and offering support during this difficult time.

Whether the family chooses cremation or burial, it’s essential to make the necessary arrangements. This involves choosing a crematorium for cremation or a burial site and notifying friends and family, using an 0800 contact number, about the details.

Utilizing the “Tell Us Once” service can simplify the process of notifying multiple government departments and organizations about the death. This service allows the bereaved to report a death to most government organizations in one go, including the local council, the Department for Work and Pensions, HM Revenue and Customs, and the Passport Office.

Dealing with the cause of death when someone dies in hospital

Understanding post-mortem examinations may be necessary in certain cases. This is when the coroner may order a post-mortem to determine the cause of death, issue a medical certificate, and enable the death to be registered. It’s important to be aware of the procedures and what to expect, like dealing with the society of allied and independent funeral directors if you choose to cremate the person who has died.

Receiving the death certificate is an important document that is needed for legal and administrative purposes, including to determine if the person who died was an organ donor. The death certificate is usually issued and collected from the registrar and is a vital proof of the death.

Communicating with the hospital mortuary may be necessary, especially if the deceased’s body is kept in the hospital mortuary before the funeral. To ensure all arrangements are in order, it’s critical to maintain clear communication, typically via an 0800 contact number.

Support is available for those who have lost a loved one in a hospital

Accessing bereavement support services can be beneficial for those who have lost a loved one. There are various organizations and support groups that provide counselling, guidance, and emotional support during the grieving process.

Utilizing NHS resources for counselling and assistance is also a valuable option. The NHS provides bereavement support through various channels including counselling services, a bereavement register, and can provide guidance regarding whether to cremate the person who has died.

Visiting the chapel of rest for loved ones can provide comfort and solace. The chapel of rest, which you might need to contact via an 0800 number, is a peaceful place where relatives can spend time with the person who died, offering an opportunity for a final farewell in a serene environment. ###

Q: What is the first step in the bereavement process when a person has passed away in hospital?

A: The first step is to obtain a medical certificate of cause of death. The hospital doctor will issue a medical certificate that shows the cause of the last illness of the person who has died. This certificate is a key document needed to register a death

Q: What should I do if I don’t understand the cause of death listed on the medical certificate?

A: If you need more clarity on the cause of death listed on the medical certificate, you should get in touch with the hospital or the doctor who issued the certificate. They should be able to provide explanations about the medical terms or causes listed on the medical certificate of death.

Q: What if the death has been referred to the coroner?

A: If the death is unexpected or the person who died wasn’t seen by a doctor before they died, it might be referred to the coroner. The coroner may conduct a post-mortem examination to determine the cause of death. Once the post-mortem examination is done, a medical certificate of death will be issued.

Q: What is the process to register a death?

A: Following the death, you have to register the death in the UK within five days. The person who can register the death is usually the next of kin such as the spouse or civil partner, or a close relative. You will need to contact your local council to make an appointment to register the death.

Q: As the next of kin, what are my responsibilities?

A: As the next of kin, you need to contact several people and organisations following the death. This can be done using the ‘Tell Us Once’ service which lets you report a death to several government departments in one go. You are also responsible for arranging the funeral.

Q: How can I handle all the organisations I need to contact following the death?

A: You can use the ‘Tell Us Once’ service offered by the government to report the death to several government departments at once. This service will notify the relevant organisations such as the Passport Office, DVLA, HMRC and Benefits.

Q: What do I need to know about the person who died to register their death?

A: You need to provide personal details about the person who died. This includes their full name, date and place of birth, last address, occupation, details of any government benefits they were receiving, and if applicable, the name and occupation of their spouse or civil partner.

Q: What happens if the person who has passed away in hospital was an organ donor?

A: If the person who passed away in the hospital was on the NHS Organ Donor Register, their wishes for organ donation will be respected and the hospital staff will facilitate the process. However, they will also keep the family of the person who has died informed and involved in the discussions.

Q: What are the next steps after registering the death?

A: After registering the death, you’ll also be given a death certificate by the hospital. You then can go ahead with planning the funeral. It is also important to inform any relevant organisations such as banks, insurance companies, utility companies, etc., of the person’s death.

Q: Who can help with funeral costs if the next of kin cannot afford it?

A: If the next of kin or other family members cannot afford the funeral costs, they can apply for a Funeral Expenses Payment from the government. You can also seek advice from the National Association of Funeral Directors about bereavement support and options to help with managing costs.

Q: What should I do when someone dies in the hospital?

A: You should first ask the hospital for the medical certificate of cause of death. Then, you will need to register the death with the local council.

Q: How can I obtain the medical certificate of cause of death?

A: You can obtain the medical certificate of cause of death from the hospital that issued it. This certificate is usually signed by a doctor and contains the cause of death.

Q: How do I register the death with the local council?

A: You can use the “tell us once” service offered by the government, which allows you to report a death to most government organisations in one go. You must register the death within a certain timeframe, usually within five days in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and within eight days in Scotland.

Q: What documents will I need to bring to register the death?

A: You will need to bring the medical certificate of cause of death and, if available, the person’s birth certificate, marriage/civil partnership certificate, and NHS medical card.

Q: Are there any financial matters I need to address after the person’s death?

A: Yes, you may need to consider informing the Department of Work and Pensions about the person’s death, as well as any banks, building societies, or insurers the person had a policy with.

Q: What if the death occurred under uncertain circumstances?

A: If the cause of death is unclear, the coroner may need to carry out a post-mortem examination. In some cases, the coroner may order a post mortem examination to understand the cause of death.

Q: How can I obtain a death certificate?

A: Once the death is registered, you can obtain a death certificate from the registrar. The death certificate is an official document showing the cause of death and is usually needed for legal and financial purposes.

Q: Will there be any costs associated with registering the death and obtaining a death certificate?

A: There may be a cost involved in obtaining a death certificate, but the cost of a simple registration is typically free of charge. However, fees may vary depending on different circumstances.

Q: What should I do if the person who died had a donor card?

A: If the person who died had carried a donor card or was on the Organ Donor Register, it is important to let the healthcare professionals know as soon as possible so that their wishes can be carried out.

Q: Is there any support available for the grieving process?

A: Yes, you may be able to get financial support or other benefits such as bereavement support payment, depending on your relationship with the person who died. You may also wish to seek support from friends, family, or professional counsellors.

Q: What steps need to be taken when someone dies in the hospital?

A: When someone dies in the hospital, the first step is to obtain a medical certificate of cause of death from the hospital. Then, the death needs to be registered with the local council.

Q: Where can I obtain the medical certificate of cause of death?

A: The medical certificate of cause of death is issued by the hospital where the person has died. You can request this from the hospital staff or the person responsible for issuing the medical certificate.

Q: How and where should the death be registered?

A: The death is registered with the local council. You can use the “tell us once” service to report a death to most government organizations in one go. It’s important to register the death within a specified timeframe, usually within five days in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and within eight days in Scotland.

Q: What documents are required to register the death?

A: You will need to bring the medical certificate of cause of death to the registrar. Additionally, you may need to provide personal and financial information about the person who has died. This may include their national insurance number, any relevant documents, and details about their next of kin.

Q: Is there a cost associated with registering the death?

A: There is no cost to register a death, but you may need to pay for copies of the death certificate. The cost of a simple copy of the death certificate is usually nominal.

Q: Can someone other than a family member register the death?

A: Yes, anyone who was present at the death, or who is arranging the funeral, or an executor of the will can register the death. You will need to provide your personal details and relationship with the person who has died.

Q: Will there be a post-mortem examination carried out?

A: In some cases, the coroner may order a post-mortem examination. This is usually done if the cause of death is unclear or if the deceased had not been seen by a doctor within 14 days before they died. If the deceased had carried a donor card, a post-mortem may not be carried out.

Q: What happens after the body has been examined in a post-mortem?

A: After the body has been examined, the coroner will issue the necessary paperwork, and then you can proceed with arranging the funeral.

Q: How does registering the death affect benefits or state pension?

A: Following the registration of the death, you’ll need to inform the Department of Work and Pensions. Depending on your circumstances, you may be able to get financial help. The department will advise you on any next steps you may need to take.

Q: Can the registrar issue the death certificate immediately?

A: The registrar will provide an envelope addressed to the registrar where the death occurred. If the coroner is involved, it may take longer for the death certificate to be issued. Once all the necessary paperwork has been completed, you can obtain the death certificate from the registrar.

Play Video

I can design and print your funeral order of service

Below are some feedback from families that have used my service

Who are we?

Here at Funeral Order Of Service.co.uk we’re committed to offering beautifully designed, highly personalised funeral orders of service for clients all over the UK. We take care of all aspects of design, printing and delivery to ensure you get a great quality product at an unexpectedly low price.

The Funeral Order of Service Template logo for Tin Thompson Owner.